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Former Mayor thanks wife for acting F.A.S.T

Published: 4 Dec 2011 12:300 comments

A POPULAR councillor says he owes his life to his wife after she spotted the signs of his stroke.

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Former Bracknell town mayor Chas Baily is also warning people to learn to watch for the signs in the victim's 'Face, Arms and Speech', and making sure they act in 'Time', as promoted in the Government's 'Stroke - Act F.A.S.T.' campaign.

The 76-year-old and wife Sandie Baily were shopping in Waitrose in Wokingham on Tuesday, November 15 when one side of Mr Baily's face dropped.

Mrs Baily, who knew the signs because her mother died after suffering a stroke, rushed him to A&E at Frimley Park Hospital, where he was given

clot-busting drugs only just within the vital time

window allowed.

Mr Baily said: "If it wasn't for Sandie, I would be dead.

"People should pay attention to the adverts about spotting the signs of a stroke - in my case it worked. You can be disabled for life from a stroke."

Mrs Baily said: "It was horrendous. We were in Waitrose and Chas wanted a cup of coffee and I complained to him that he dropped it in my saucer.

"I looked up and Chas' face was down on one side. I said 'Are you all right?'

"He tried to mumble something and I couldn't understand him - so I said 'Come on, we're going.'

"I drove to Frimley Hospital and they were fantastic. I owe everything to them. They were absolutely marvellous.

"We were just in the time limit for him to have

the drugs."

Frimley Park Hospital's stroke service provides a 24-hour, seven days a week thrombolysis service where clot busting drugs are administered within three hours of the onset of a stroke to break down blood costs.

Mr Baily, who is a councillor on Bracknell Forest Council for Hanworth, said: "At 4.20pm I had a CT scan, at 5.20pm they were putting this stroke busting drug into me and I was on the ward by 7.15pm.

"I remember one of the doctors was asking me questions. I can remember saying I wasn't feeling very well and I woke up on the stroke ward."

Mr Baily was released from hospital on Monday, November 21, and he was carrying out council engagements by Wednesday, last week. Mrs Baily added: "I would like to thank everybody who sent Chas cards and for the support we have had from our community."

For more information on how to spot the signs of a stroke, visit www.nhs.uk/actfast/pages/stroke.aspx

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